Rubric | ECE 624 Advanced Topics in Child Development, Learning, and Developmentally Appropriate Practices | Ashford University


Assignment Directions:

For this assignment, you will be creating a rubric that you will use to evaluate your staff based on how they are incorporating play into their classroom and how they handle transitions. Before creating your rubric, it is suggested that you read the article, “How to Create RubricsPreview the document” to ensure that you understand how to develop an effective rubric. You can create your rubric using a table in a Word document or by using the rubric generator Rubi Star (Links to an external site.). Your rubric must contain the following:

  • Performance Level Titles (.5 points): Includes four performance levels titles (emerging, progressing, partial mastery, mastery, etc.) to describe each characteristic.
  • Characteristics (.5 points): Includes at least five characteristics (skills, knowledge, or behaviors) to be rated on the rubric. Three of these characteristics must be related to play (see Figure 3.1 of text for ideas), one must be related to transitions, and one must be related to disruptions.
  • Performance Level Descriptors (2 points): Creates a performance level descriptor for each characteristic.

In addition to creating your rubric, address the following:

  • 1. Defend your decision to include the characteristics you did on your rubric. Support your defense with current research. (1 point)
  • 2. Explain how using this rubric will encourage the 21st-century skill of collaboration. Support your explanation with scholarly or credible sources. (1 point)
  • 3. Summarize how you would use this rubric to foster the knowledge and skills of your staff regarding play in the classroom, transitions, and disruptions. Support your summary with scholarly or credible sources.   (1 point)
  • 4. Explain how you might utilize this rubric to encourage self-reflection in your staff and ways in which self-reflection foster’s professional growth. Support your explanation with scholarly or credible sources. (1 point



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Rubric analysis | Education homework help


  

Rubric Analysis

Using two different sources, respond in writing (APA format) using the prompts below to guide your written analysis.
 

Part 1:

· Explore the Exemplars website, specifically the Resources tab for Rubrics. Review the Exemplars Math Rubric and Exemplars Reading Rubric.

· Questions to discuss:

o How does the Exemplars criteria for both math and reading rubrics follow a top-down or bottom-up approach? How do you know?

o To what degree are performance level descriptions addressed?

o Do these live up to what Brookhart proposes, that “. . .the most important aspect of the levels is that performance be described, with language that depicts what one would observe in the work rather than the quality conclusions one would draw” (p.26)?

o In your opinion, what are the values placed on using the terminology for mastery (Novice, Apprentice, Practitioner, and Expert)? In other words, how effective do you believe this terminology is and why?

Part 2:

· Explain the position Brookhart argues in Chapter 2 against rubrics that merely summarize the requirements of the task, as opposed to rubrics that describe evidence of learning.

· Explain what Brookhart means when saying; “Rubrics should not confuse the learning outcome to be assessed with the task used to assess it” (p.15).

· What is the relationship between this and what you learned about aligning formative assessments with the learning standards and objectives?

Brookhart, S. M. (2013). How to create and use rubrics for formative assessment and grading. Alexandria,VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

· Chapter 1: What are Rubrics & why are they Important?

· Chapter 2: Common Misconceptions About Rubrics

· Chapter 3: Writing or Selecting Effective Rubrics 

Page 15

Confusing learning outcomes with tasks Rubrics should not confuse the learning outcome to be assessed with the task used to assess it. Rubrics are not assignment directions set into chart format. The biggest mistake teachers make when they use rubrics with performance assessment is that they focus on the task, the product, and not the learning outcome or proficiency the task is supposed to get students to demonstrate. This has been my experience and has been documented by others as well.

Page 26

How to write performance-level descriptions The most important aspect of the levels is that performance be described , with language that depicts what one would observe in the work rather than the quality conclusions one would draw. As I noted in Chapter 2, a common misconception I see regarding rubrics is that after criteria are identified, they are given evaluative scales (for example, Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor). These are not rubrics; they are old-fashioned grading scales. Descriptions of performance levels can be general, describing a whole family of tasks (for example, “Uses an appropriate solution strategy”), or task-specific (for example, “Uses the equation 2 x + 5 = 15”). Decide whether you need general or task-specific descriptions of performance levels (see Figure 1.2); in most cases, general descriptions are preferred. A second aspect of levels of performance that needs to be decided is how many levels there should be. The best answer to this question is the conceptual answer: Use as many levels as you can describe in terms of meaningful differences in performance quality. For some simple tasks, this will be two levels: Acceptable and Redo, or Mastery and Not Yet. In practice, you don’t want to end up with an overabundance of uncoordinated evaluation results that will be difficult to summarize. And often there are several different ways you could describe the continuum of performance quality, using more or fewer levels. Therefore I recommend that you choose a number of levels that will coordinate with your requirements for grading (Brookhart, 1999, 2011), if possible. For many classrooms, this means four (for example, Advanced, Proficient, Basic, Below Basic) or five (for example, A , B , C , D , F ) levels. If it is not possible to coordinate the number of levels with practical grading constraints, rather than violating the criteria and their descriptions, design a rubric that is faithful to the task and its quality criteria, and then figure out a way to include it in a summary grade if that is needed (see Chapter 11). Once you have decided on the number of levels, you need a description of performance quality for each level of each criterion. A common way to write these descriptions is to begin with the performance level you intend for most students to reach
(for example, Proficient), describe that, and then adjust the remaining descriptions from there— backing off (for example, for Basic and Below Basic) or building up (for example, for Advanced). Another common way is to start with the top category (for example, A), describe that, and then back off (for example, for B , C , D , F ). These methods illustrate two different approaches to assessment. In a standards-based grading context, Advanced is supposed to be described by achievement above and beyond what is expected. In a traditional grading context, often the A is what students are aiming for.

 



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Play, transitions, and disruptions rubric


Play, Transitions, and Disruptions Rubric

This week we have learned about incorporating play into the classroom and planning for disruptions and transitions in the classroom. These ideas are connected to the second pillar of becoming the Whole Teacher, incorporating developmentally appropriate practice. How will you know if the teachers you work with are able to effectively implement developmentally appropriate strategies in the classroom for play, transitions, and disruptions? One way to know for sure is to utilize a rubric as a tool for evaluating teachers and providing constructive feedback. Rubrics provide clarity regarding what is expected and therefore are commonly used tools for providing feedback in education.

Assignment Directions:

For this assignment, you will be creating a rubric that you will use to evaluate your staff based on how they are incorporating play into their classroom and how they handle transitions. Before creating your rubric, it is suggested that you read the article, “How to Create RubricsPreview the document” to ensure that you understand how to develop an effective rubric. You can create your rubric using a table in a Word document or by using the rubric generator Rubi Star (Links to an external site.). Your rubric must contain the following:

  • Performance Level Titles (.5 points): Includes four performance levels titles (emerging, progressing, partial mastery, mastery, etc.) to describe each characteristic.
  • Characteristics (.5 points): Includes at least five characteristics (skills, knowledge, or behaviors) to be rated on the rubric. Three of these characteristics must be related to play (see Figure 3.1 of text for ideas), one must be related to transitions, and one must be related to disruptions.
  • Performance Level Descriptors (2 points): Creates a performance level descriptor for each characteristic.

In addition to creating your rubric, address the following:

  • Defend your decision to include the characteristics you did on your rubric. Support your defense with current research. (1 point)
  • Explain how using this rubric will encourage the 21st-century skill of collaboration. Support your explanation with scholarly or credible sources. (1 point)
  • Summarize how you would use this rubric to foster the knowledge and skills of your staff regarding play in the classroom, transitions, and disruptions. Support your summary with scholarly or credible sources.   (1 point)
  • Explain how you might utilize this rubric to encourage self-reflection in your staff and ways in which self-reflection foster’s professional growth. Support your explanation with scholarly or credible sources. (1 point)

Research and Resource Expectations:

  • Source Requirement (.75 points): 
    • At least two scholarly peer-reviewed sources
    • At least one professional credible source

Writing and Formatting Expectations:

  • Title Page: Must include a separate title page with the following:
    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course name and number
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted
  • Academic Voice (.25 points): Academic voice is used (avoids casual language, limited use of “I”, it is declarative).
  • Purpose and Organization: (.25 points):  Demonstrates logical progression of ideas.
  • Syntax and Mechanics (.25 points): Writing displays meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
  • APA Formatting (.25 points): Papers are formatted properly and all sources are cited and referenced in APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.).
  • Suggested Assignment Length (.25 points): This assignment should be three to four double-spaced pages in length (not including title and reference pages).

Resources:

MASD Instructional Technology. (2013, June 17). Create Awesome Rubrics using Rubistar (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vsxrKLeUeY

  • This video shows how to use the website RubiStar to create rubrics and will be helpful for you Week Three Assignment.

Website

Mueller, J. (2014). Rubrics (authentic assessment toolbox) (Links to an external site.). Retrieved from http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/rubrics.htm

  • This website shares information about how to create a rubric. You might find it helpful as you work on your Week Three Assignment.

  

Brophy, T. (n.d.). Writing effective rubrics (Links to an external site.). Retrieved from http://assessment.aa.ufl.edu/Data/Sites/22/media/slo/writing_effective_rubrics_guide_v2.pdf

University of Connecticut. (n.d.). How to create rubrics (Links to an external site.). Retrieved from http://www.assessment.uconn.edu/docs/How_to_Create_Rubrics.pdf

Feldman, J. 2008. Transition time tricks (Links to an external site.). Earlychildhood NEWS. Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=309

Rettig, M. (1995). Play and cultural diversity (Links to an external site.). The Journal of Educational Issue of Language Minority Students, 15. Retrieved from
http://www.ncela.us/files/rcd/BE020476/Play_and_Cultural_Diversity.pdf  

Vandermaas-Peeler, M. (n.d.). Cultural variations in parental support of children’s play. Retrieved from www.wwu.edu/culture/Vandermaas-Peeler.htm

How to create rubrics. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://assessment.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1804/2016/06/How_to_Create_Rubrics.pdf

  • This article explains how to create effective rubrics and will be useful as you develop your rubric for the Week assignment.



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Review the pages in the dba doctoral study rubric and research


Review the pages in the DBA Doctoral Study Rubric and Research Handbook that have to do with writing and aligning the problem, purpose, and research question for a DBA doctoral study. These are pages 30–33. The DBA Doctoral Study Rubric and Handbook can be found at this page: Please see attached.

  1. Prepare a Word document with your name and the following information for your proposed study:
    1. The specific business problem (one sentence)
    2. The first sentence of a purpose statement (one sentence)
    3. The research question (one sentence)
    4. Whether is it qualitative or quantitative (one word)

Before you submit your Assignment, check to see that sentences a, b, and c are aligned. Read the Handbook and see the following examples attached.



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Midterm exam identifications, essay questions, and rubric


 

 

Instructions

Part One: Identifications (10 points each; 200 points total)

This section requires you to write short answers to each identification question. There are 20 identification questions worth 10 points each for 200 points total. Each answer must address who, what, when, where, and why in the identification.

Each answer should be no more than one paragraph in length (4-5 sentences or 100-150 words), double-spaced with 1-inch margins using 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font. You are not required to include citations. Each answer must:

  • Identify the individual named, author, event, and other key individuals and groups (2 points)
  • Discuss what the identification term or name is about (2 points)
  • Describe when it occurred (2 points)
  • Describe where it occurred (2 points)
  • Explain why the individual, group, or event is significant for understanding African American Studies (2 points)

Listed below are twenty identification terms you will need to answer in Part One of the exam. You must answer all twenty terms to receive full credit. DO NOT copy and paste language from classroom resources or any other source. This is an act of plagiarism and is a violation of the academic integrity pledge you signed in Week 1.

The twenty identification terms are drawn from Weeks 1-4 of the AASP 201 classroom resources. Please use your class readings first to answer the terms before resorting to outside sources.

1. Jim Crow

2. Segregation

3. Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

4. Frederick Douglass

5. William Green

6. Ida B. Wells

7. Tuskegee University

8. Black Studies

9. 40 Acres and a Mule

10. KKK

11. Lynching

12.  1619

13. Henry Louis Gates Jr.

14. Life of a Slave Girl

15. Civil War

16. Reconstruction

17. White Supremacists

18. NAACP

19. Niagara Movement

20. Harlem Renaissance

Part Two: Essay (100 points)

You are required to answer one of three essay questions described below. The essay portion must be 4-5 pages in length, double-spaced, numbered, include 1 inch margins, use 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font.

Your essay must include a Works Cited page. The citation style of the Works Cited page may be either Chicago, APA, or MLA. The selected citations must be appropriate to the exam topic and the citations must support the assertions made in the exam.

Your essay will include three main parts—the Thesis/Introduction, Argument, and Conclusion.

The Introduction section should clearly state the thesis within the first 1-2 paragraphs. The thesis must be relevant and appropriate to the argument and demonstrate an accurate and complete understanding of the question. This section should make it clear which question you are answering, but it should do more than restate the question by offering a brief response and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

The Argument section (3-4 pages) should incorporate pertinent details from the assigned readings but you may also use outside readings. The section must provide relevant historical evidence to support the thesis and the key claims made in the argument as needed. It should maintain focus and avoid sidetracking. It should present your answer to the question clearly and concisely in an organized manner and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

The Conclusion section should be in the last part of your essay exam within the last 1-2 paragraphs. It should briefly restate the thesis and summarize the main points of the argument. It should also demonstrate insight and understanding regarding the question asked and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

A scoring rubric for the essay portion is included below. Please answer one of the following essay questions:

1. Examine the impact that slavery had on the lives of enslaved women in America?

2. Interrogate the role of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1940) on the freedom struggles in America and around the world? 

3. Booker T. Washington believed that practical education was the route to freedom for Black/African people in America. Do you agree or disagree with this assertion? 



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Final project one milestone two guidelines and rubric


Overview: As a healthcare professional driven to advocacy, you must be aware of the disparities of healthcare systems within and across borders. In this module, you examined globally emerging health issues such as global health threats, infectious diseases, and human trafficking. These emerging health issues require a focus on prevention and an understanding of the best practices for the treatment of the affected vulnerable populations.

Prompt: In this milestone, you will analyze the major health issues in the country you chose for Final Project One. 

To begin your health study, summarize the three major health issues identified in the country you selected (Spain), including the economic, social, and cultural factors influencing the health issue. Describe what the various stakeholders (government, other organizations, vulnerable populations, etc.) are currently doing to address the issues. Evaluate the current response to each issue as good, bad, or needing improvement, and then propose interventions for improving the health of a vulnerable population impacted by each issue.

The rubric for this assignment is attached. 

Final project article review guidelines and rubric


For your Final Project Article Review, you will review and analyze published research that you might encounter as a health professional. You will select two journal articles from the provided list on a topic of interest. You will create an article review that identifies the articles and their relevance to your field; summarizes the articles, including their findings; compares and contrasts the statistical methods used in the articles; explains why the methods used were appropriate; discusses their limitations; and concludes with recommendations for future work. 

Final Project Article Review is divided into three journals, which will be submitted at various points throughout the course to scaffold learning and ensure quality final submissions. These article journals will be submitted in Modules Two, Five, and Six. The completed article review will be submitted in Module Eight.

Imagine you are a biostatistician working at a local health organization. Part of your job is to analyze trends and draw conclusions about health issues that affect your organization. Your supervisor has asked you to do a quick literature search for published research on an upcoming topic as preparation for a new project. The goal is to understand the current biostatistical methods and guidelines being used on similar studies so that you could eventually use that to inform the design of the new study. Your job is to find a minimum of two research articles on your topic from the Final Project Article Review Articles List document, examine the broad health question(s) addressed in each, and critically assess the statistical methods used to analyze the data and arrive at the articles’ conclusions. You will present the results of this analysis to your supervisor and peers in an article review. Specifically, your article review must address the following critical elements: 

I. Background: Use this section to provide a brief context for the health problem, issue, or trend you are researching. Specifically, you should answer:

 A. What topic or health question did you research and why is it relevant to public health, nursing, or the health science professions? Give realworld examples to support your answer. 

B. How can biostatistics help inform decision making around your topic? Support your answer with specific examples. 

II. Article Selection: In this section, discuss how and why you selected your main article and the related article. Be sure to: 

A. Explain why you selected these specific articles to examine over others in your field that use biostatistical methods and data. Justify your answer. 

B. Assess each article’s importance to health decision making in your field. Give real-world examples to illustrate your answer. I

II. Findings: This section should highlight the major findings of each of the articles you selected for your supervisor and peers. Specifically: 

A. What are the findings of each article and what implications do they have individually and collectively for solving the health problem in question? Support your answer with specific examples from your field. B. Explain how key biostatistical calculations and methods support the conclusions in each article. Cite relevant information from the articles that support your answer.

IV. Methods: Use this section to compare and contrast the methods used in the articles you selected with an eye to assessing the quality and limitations of the findings and informing future research. Specifically, you should: 

A. Explain why the authors of each article selected the methods they did. How appropriate were the methods to the overall purpose of the paper? Justify your response. 

B. Analyze a difference and similarity in the methods chosen with respect to the health question being addressed in the selected articles. Explain your answer using evidence from the articles selected and information you have learned in the course. 

C. Assess a strength and limitation of the different approaches used in the articles you selected. Explain your answer using evidence from the articles you selected and information you have learned in the course.

ATTACHED  ARE   THREE  JOURNALS   PART OF THE  FINAL PROJECT.   PLEASE FOLLOW  RUBRIC CLOSELY.  Rubric for assignment is also attached. 

        

Final project data analysis guidelines and rubric


Overview:

Now that you have submitted your article review, you will submit Your Final Project Data Analysis. The Final Project Article Review was an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to interpret statistics included in an article. The Final Project Data Analysis is a chance to show that you know how to choose the correct statistics to analyze a set of data and calculate these using software. Regardless of their field of interest, health professionals across disciplines need to be able to run basic biostatistical calculations to describe a set of data. The Final Project Data Analysis reinforces these critical skills by asking you to conduct your own analysis of a small data set, explain the basic parameters of the data, graph it, and run simple tests. You will present this data analysis in a brief statistical report, using language appropriate to a non-technical audience. The Final Project Data Analysis consists of four milestones, submitted in Modules Two, Three, Five, and Seven. The final submission occurs in Module Nine.

Prompt: 

Biostatisticians are constantly called upon to analyze data in order to help researchers and health officials answer critical questions about populations’ health. For this assessment, you will imagine you are a biostatistical consultant on a small study for a local health organization. In the Assignments Guidelines and Rubrics area of the course, you will use the Data Analysis Data Set and Data Analysis Data Description, along with some background information on how and when the data was collected and the general research question the organization is interested in answering. This is often the way you will receive data in the real world. Your task is to help the organization answer their question by critically analyzing the data. You will compute your chosen statistics, interpret the results, and present the results and recommendations to non-technical decision makers in the form of a data analysis. Keep in mind that it is your job to do this from a statistical standpoint. Be sure to justify your conclusions and recommendations with appropriate statistical support.

Milestones 

Milestone One: Select Health Question In Module Two, you will identify the health question you will be researching for instructor feedback and approval. Milestone One should be several sentences in length. This milestone is graded with the Milestone One Rubric. 

Milestone Two: Describe the Data In Module Three, you will describe the key features of the data set, including limitations that might exist. Milestone Two should be one or two paragraphs in length. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Two Rubric. 

Milestone Three: Process and Calculations In Module Five, you will create a table in which you propose the calculations (descriptive statistics and statistical test) and graph(s) you will need to perform to answer the health question you are investigating. Then you will complete the table. For Milestone Three, you will submit this completed table. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Three Rubric. 

Milestone Four: Data Analysis In Module Seven, you will submit the data analysis section of Final Project Data Analysis. This section includes the graph(s) and statistics you conducted on the data set to answer the health question. This milestone is graded with the Milestone Four Rubric. 

Final Project Data Analysis In Module Nine, complete the conclusions section and the rest of the completed data analysis (including graph(s), statistical output for chosen test, or Excel spreadsheet with calculations). You have been working on this analysis in Milestones One through Four. Before submitting, revise each section of the analysis based on the feedback you received from your instructor and peers. It should be a complete, polished artifact containing all of the critical elements of the final product. It should reflect the incorporation of feedback gained throughout the course. This submission will be graded using the Final Project Data Analysis Rubric.