Positive behavior planning | Education homework help


      Positive Behavior Planning      

This discussion is your opportunity to demonstrate your understanding of the objective: Compare positive proactive classroom behavior strategies.  The discussion represents an introduction to Course Learning Outcome 3 and the MASE Program Learning Outcome 1.

In an authentic classroom environment, discipline procedures can either be proactive or reactive.  Proactive discipline focuses on classroom management that is “designed to promote student self-control by focusing teacher intervention as the cause of discipline problems…” (Henley, Ramsey & Algozzine, 2009, p. 288).  Reactive discipline, on the other hand, is where the teacher is responding to discipline problems instead of proactively predicting potential situations.  Teachers who anticipate and plan for student behaviors have long-term classroom management success.

You notice that when Mr. Franklin tells the class it is time to stop their work and move to the next activity, it takes a long time for the class to complete their current activities, gather their materials, and transition to the next class.  Because of this lag time, the students are often late to their next class, which makes Mr. Franklin feel frustrated.  Responding to this ongoing issue, Mr. Franklin tells the class they will miss 5 minutes of their lunch time to make up for their lateness. 

Initial Post: Create an initial response that explains how Mr. Franklin’s response was reactive instead of proactive.  Describe at least three proactive strategies Mr. Franklin can use for a smoother transition process.  Include in your description how this strategy would be implemented with supporting evidence from the readings and Week Four’s Instructor Guidance. 

Guided Response: Review the posts of your classmates and that of your instructor.  Respond, using support from our assigned reading and the Instructor Guidance, to the following questions with careful attention to the details presented by your peers in the selected posts.  You must respond to at least two peers.

  • Summarize what proactive discipline strategies means to you.
  • Compare your peers’ response to your initial ideas of proactive discipline strategies. 
  • Explain how they are the same or different to your own ideas presented in your initial post.

Though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you (including the instructor) before the last day of the discussion.  This will further the conversation while also giving you opportunities to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real work experiences with this topic.



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Strategies for positive behavior | Education homework help


 

Scenario: Steven’s Behavior

Three-year-old Steven loves the block area. The educators, Ms. Barbara and Mr. Jason, change the materials bimonthly. Cars, farm animals, community helpers, and dinosaurs are some of the topics and materials that have been incorporated into the Block Center. Steven is excited about each one. He sits on the carpet with his Center Card and anxiously waits to be released to Center Time. When his name is called, Steven rushes to the block area. Steven is happy when he places his Center Card in one of the four available spots. While in the Block Center, he interacts, shares, and cooperates with peers. However, when it is time to transition to Bathroom and Handwashing, Steven refuses to clean up the materials. He folds his arms, stomps, and says, “NO, I don’t want to!” He pushes any peers that are near him.

Some days, Steven does not get his Center Card in place before his peers, and the Block Center is full. Steven stomps, yells, and tries to replace a peer’s card with his own. Recently, he began to push peers out of the block center in an attempt to make room for himself.

Assess Steven’s behavior in the scenario and write a report on your assessment.

  1. Choose two direct guidance strategies to respond to Steven’s behavior when he needs to transition from blocks.
  2. Choose two direct guidance strategies to respond to Steven’s behavior when he does not achieve a spot in the Block Center.
  3. Guidance strategies should NOT include closing the Block Center.
  4. For each guidance strategy, address the following:
  5. What will the educators do and say before, during, and after guidance strategy implementation?
  6. What are the expected results of the guidance strategy?
  7. What are Steven’s possible reactions after two weeks of guidance strategy implementation?
  8. What will the educators do next?

Guidance strategies need to be supported by a minimum of 3 credible resources. Use in-text citations where appropriate.

Your submission should be 3-5 pages of written content. Be sure to proofread your work for grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Include an APA formatted title page and reference page.



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marketing through positive communication | Education homework help


CORRECT ASSIGNMENT

Marketing Through Positive Communication. 1st Post Due by Day 3. Marketing is about much more than placing an advertisement in the local paper or planning a special event. Strong family relationships that reflect positive interactions should be seen as the driving force of your program’s success. Effective family relationships are often centered around comprehensive systems of communication. These systems can be composed of items such as daily logs for the families, regular newsletters, accident and incident reports, orientation and open house programs, and parent conferences. This discussion will focus on the creation of relationships with families for overall program success. After reading the assigned chapters from the textbook for this week, please respond to the following:

In your initial post,

  • Explain the difference between internal and external marketing found in Chapter 8.
    • Give at least two examples of each that you think are essential to program success.
    • Provide a rational.
  • Briefly describe the three approaches to working with families found in Chapter 12.
    • Highlight that which most closely aligns with your thinking
    • Explain why you chose that approach.
  • Thinking about the program you have chosen to work with for this course, answer the following questions:
    • What is the program currently doing to actively cultivate positive perceptions among their current clients and community?
    • Are there features of the program that might result in negative perceptions?
    • How might they add to their communication strategies with families and the community to building stronger, more positive relationships?



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article two:from rules to guidelines: moving to the positive


The Assignment

Summarize the article by answering the three questions listed below. Each question should have an answer that has a minimum of 5 sentences. Please make sure you read the statement on Plagiarism. Also, do not copy and paste the article- that is plagiarism.

 

1.  What is the main focus of the article? What is the “problem” with rules?

2.  What are three strategies that are discussed in the article? How can teachers move from rules to

     guidelines?

3.  How will you implement the strategies/ideas (from paragraph 2) when working with children? How will you implement this new knowledge into your classroom?

Article Link: Guidance Matters.docx 

(If you have difficulty accessing this pdf, contact your instructor for assistance)

Grading Criteria

The summary is graded on a 100 point scale.  Maximum points are given when length of 3 paragraphs with each paragraph containing a minimum of 5 sentences is met and content summarizes key strategies to use with young children and families.

20 points – Three paragraphs are included, each paragraph has a minimum of five sentences

20 points – First paragraph summarizes the main focus of the article

30 points – Second paragraph summarizes three strategies from the article. 

30 points – Third paragraph gives specific strategies/ideas you will use when working with young children.

Points are deducted for errors in grammar and spelling.  Also noted is clarity of the summary and students comprehension of the content.



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Positive social change | EDDD 8110 – The Art of Online Teaching | Walden University


Post your response to the following:

You just won the Online Educator of the Year award! Write a  300-word acceptance speech for this prestigious honor. In your speech  address:

1-The qualities that made you such a successful leader in the  online classroom (Who can you thank for helping you to learn and  cultivate these qualities?

2-How you feel that online learning contributes to positive social  change (Consider access to education, global creative problem solving,  connecting diverse perspectives, geographically agnostic learning, and  serving students with mobility challenges, communication challenges, or  learning differences¬.)

SAMPLE FROM A STUDENT IN MY CLASS

Thank you so much for this honor, I am truly blessed to receive this  award. Teaching has been a passion of mine since I was a little girl,  and my dream was to become a college professor. When I branched into the  teaching scene, I was looking for a school that believed in giving back  to the community, understanding the importance of culture in the  classroom, and the ability to relate real world issues and successes  within in the classroom.

When I was a student, I had several professors who brought culture  and diversity into the classroom and connected it to the course  material. I loved learning how the material was relevant to social  society and how I could use that information to make a difference.  Having professors who truly cared how the students were going to be able  to use the course material in their lives outside of school, is why I  wanted to become the type of teacher I am today.

When I started my search for the school I wanted to teach for,  Walden University (2016) stood out because they, “consider their self a  learning organization and believes that quality and integrity are the  cornerstone of all academic processes” (p.22). Integrity is a highlight  in my courses because I believe students cannot be successful if their  professor and themselves are not honest with their course work and  having a standard of high moral principles to do the right thing.

Online learning contributes to a positive social change, and I am  thrilled to consider myself part of the online learning community.  Online learning is about being able to reach a diverse group of students  across the world and Walden University (2016), “fosters social change  through education of scholar-practitioners, increasing access to higher  education, and applying research to helping solve problems in the world”  (p.6). Learning through the online platform allows an increase of  access to higher education for those who cannot attend in-person, or if  there is a certain degree a student wishes to achieve, and a local  school does not offer it. With the increase of higher education access,  it also increases diverse perspectives within the classroom. It is an  incredible feeling as an online educator to be able to teach a diverse  group of students; I find this contributes to the overall success of the  course because it adds value and additional insight into the course  material.

As an online educator I understand that students may have  communication challenges, mobility challenges, and/or learning  differences as they could have in-person learning as well, but knowing  these challenges I am, “sensitive to the various learning styles and  particularly the way I assess student’s performance” (Katz, 2020, p.5). I  like to reach out to all of my students on the first day and have a  private conversation with them and ask them is they have any learning  difficulties I should be made aware of, and then we can discuss how we  can work through them to make sure the student is able learn the course  material and perform to their best ability.

Again, I want to thank you so much for this honor, I am truly humbled.

RESOURCES

https://www.waldenu.edu/about/social-change



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Assessments for positive change | Education homework help


 

As a counselor, you are in a unique position to effect positive social change for your clients, your practice, and your community. In reflecting on what you have learned in this course, consider how you can achieve social change.

To Prepare:

  • Think of what you have learned over the past 10 weeks in this course and how this new learning and knowledge helps you to promote positive social change in your community.

By Day 3 of Week 11

Post and explain how you might be able to apply the content from this course to achieve positive social change in your community.

References:

 

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 1: History of Testing and Assessment. In The essentials of testing and assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 3-20). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 12: Informal assessment: Observation, rating scales, classification methods, environmental assessment, records and personal documents, and performance-based assessment. In The essentials of testing and assessment: A practical guide to counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 281-305). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

 

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 8: Assessment of educational ability: Survey battery, diagnostic, readiness, and cognitive ability tests. In The essentials of testing and assessment: A practical guide to counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 157-189). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

Beidas, R. S., & Kendall, P. C. (2010), Training therapists in evidence-based practice: A critical review of studies from a systems-contextual perspective. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 17, pp. 1–30. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2850.2009.01187.x

Hiebert, B. (1996). Using informal methods to assess client change. Guidance & Counseling, 11(4), 3–12.
Note: 

Juhnke, G. A. (1995). Mental health counseling assessment: Broadening one’s understanding of the client and the client’s presenting concerns. ERIC Digest, 1–6.
Note: 

UTPsyc.org (n.d.). Psychology of words: Projective tests of words and language. The Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). Retrieved from http://www.utpsyc.org/TATintro/

Laureate Education (Producer) (2010). Introduction to assessment part 1 [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 3: “Diagnosis in the assessment process.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 43-58). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 4: “The assessment report process: Interviewing the client and writing the report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 59-80). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Box 4.5: “Summary of assessment report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (p. 76). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Appendix D: “Sample assessment report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 321-326). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning

Carlson, J. F., Geisinger, K. F., & Jonson, J. L. (Eds.). (2017). The twentieth mental measurements yearbook. Lincoln, NE: Burros Center for Testing.

 

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 3: “Diagnosis in the assessment process.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 43-58). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 4: “The assessment report process: Interviewing the client and writing the report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 59-80). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Appendix D: “Sample assessment report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 321-326). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Box 4.5: “Summary of assessment report.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (p. 76). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

 

Craigen, L. M., Healey, A. C., Walley, C. T., Byrd, R., & Schuster, J. (2010). Assessment and Self-Injury: Implications for Counselors. Measurement & Evaluation in Counseling & Development, 43(1), pp. 3-15. doi:10.1177/0748175610362237
Note: You will access this article through the Walden Library databases.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 5: “Test worthiness: Validity, reliability: cross-cultural fairness, and assessment.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 83-109). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Rosenthal, H. (2017). Chapter 8: Assessment and testing. In Encyclopedia of counseling (4th ed.) (pp. 367-411). New York, NY: Routledge. (4th edition ONLY)

Laureate Education (2010). Reliability and validity [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Producer.
Dr. Steven Little demonstrates reliability and validity and how to use them to evaluate an assessment.

 

Craigen, L. M., Healey, A. C., Walley, C. T., Byrd, R., & Schuster, J. (2010). Assessment and Self-Injury: Implications for Counselors. Measurement & Evaluation in Counseling & Development, 43(1), pp. 3-15. doi:10.1177/0748175610362237
Note: You will access this article through the Walden Library databases.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 6: “Statistical Concepts: Making Meaning out of Raw Scores.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 110-126). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 7: “Statistical concepts: Creating new scores to interpret test data.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 127-149). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Beck, A. T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., Steer, R. A. (1988). An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: Psychometric properties. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 893-897.
Note: This is a seminal article.

Smarr, K. L., & Keefer, A. L. (2011). Measures of depression and depressive symptoms: Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken), 63, (11), pp. 454-466. doi: 10.1002/acr.20556.

 

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Exercise 3.3: “Practice making a diagnosis.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide for counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 55). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Craigen, L. M., Healey, A. C., Walley, C. T., Byrd, R., & Schuster, J. (2010). Assessment and Self-Injury: Implications for Counselors. Measurement & Evaluation in Counseling & Development, 43(1), pp. 3-15. doi:10.1177/0748175610362237
Note: You will access this article through the Walden Library databases.

Carlson, J. F., Geisinger, K. F., & Jonson, J. L. (Eds.). (2017). The twentieth mental measurements yearbook. Lincoln, NE: Burros Center for Testing.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 6: “Statistical Concepts: Making Meaning out of Raw Scores.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide to counselors, social workers, and psychologists (pp. 110-126). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Neukrug, E. S., & Fawcett, R. C. (2015). Chapter 7: “Statistical concepts: Creating new scores to interpret test data.” In The essentials of Testing and Assessment: A practical guide to counselors, social workers, and psychologists  (pp. 127-149). Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Laureate Education (2010). Standard scores [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Producer

Dr. Steven Little demonstrates a normal curve and the relationships of derived scores to the normal curve.



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