Study Tips – How to Study for High School Finals



Some of the most common questions involving studying concern finals, and rightfully so. For many high school students, their finals determine their success or failure in a class. That one test can be 50% of a student’s grade for an entire semester of work. Here are four steps that will help you make sure that you are getting the most out of your study sessions for high school finals.

1. Make sure you have all of your materials.

Few things are more annoying than having to continually re-gather your school materials. Make sure you have all the books and other materials you need for that class. Frankly, though, your books should simply be a reference by this time. You have been taking good notes and studying all along, so your most important materials aren’t in your books. It’s in your own words on your own paper.

You also want to make sure you have enough materials to stay put for at least 50 minutes. A writing utensil, paper on which to make new review materials, and a focused mind should be enough. If you would rather make a digital resource than a hand-written one, that will work. But before committing to a computer, consider these three benefits of hand-writing your review materials.

First, you have the added memory aid of kinesthetic learning. This is a primary way people take in information, and, believe it or not, simply writing something down can be tremendously helpful for memorization. Second, there are visual helps that come from hand-writing a new review sheet that are missed on a computer screen. For example, many people have had the experience of remembering where an answer was on a particular page. If you’ve ever thought, “I remember that It was under the picture of the alligator on the top right hand corner of the page… ,” you know what I’m talking about. That benefit is mostly lost on a scrolling computer screen. Third, successful students know the benefits of arrows, diagrams, scribbles, doodles, and every other weird hand-written elements for studying. You miss that on Microsoft Word. There is no way around it with the current state of technology.

If you have all of your materials, you are now ready for step 2, setting the environment for a successful final exam study session.

2. Set up a great environment for studying.

Many college students miss this element entirely. Consider this: how many students have you seen at Starbucks with a laptop open, Facebook in the background, gmail chat in the foreground, twitter feeds buzzing their phones, text messages coming in every three minutes, and a chemistry book in their lap? That type of studying – if it can even be called “studying” – is not particularly helpful for studying for finals. High school students need to understand this element of studying for finals before graduating. Your environment matters. It can make or break your study session.

The problem with a bad environment is that time moves at the same speed whether you are learning or not. Many a disappointed student has spent hours at the coffee shop cramming for exams but failed a test because of a poor environment. Great environments enhance studying exponentially.

Great environments, while being different for each individual, will have certain things in common. Social media will be held at bay. As difficult as that sounds, it must be done. Tell Facebook, “Goodbye,” for an hour. Twitter, texting, Voxer, and HeyTell have no place in a finals study session. More traditional media like television also needs to be shut down for a while. Set an environment where you can concentrate without the constant pull of media all around you. Music can help some students stay focused, but try to make sure it is instrumental and playing quietly in the background if at all. The quieter and more focused your environment is, the more productive your study session will be.

3. Focus your studies on the most important ideas and details.

When studying for finals, you should not be re-reading the chapters. Reading is an important part of the learning process, but it is too comprehensive to be helpful on a final exam. You want just the biggest, most important details. Birthdays, maiden names, pets names, favorite colors, and state flowers are usually not on the final exams. Essays about major thought-movements and the key thinkers involved are on final exams.

Acing your finals is dependent on whether or not you can focus your learning on the most important ideas. If you can, you are sure to score higher in less time studying. If you cannot, you are sure to know a lot of information, have spent a lot of hours in the library, and not understand why so much of what you studied wasn’t on the exam. Learning what to learn is as important as learning how to learn.

4. Study.

Get to work on what you know. Go over the notes you’ve made, make a study guide for yourself, and do the work. I recommend 50 minutes of studying at a time. Break those sections up with a ten-minute break to get the most out of your session.

5. Stop studying, sleep and dominate the final test.

There comes a point in every study session where every student has to sleep. Sometimes students forget about this. They stay up late, drinking a lot of coffee, feeling miserable, and working for a long time. Then when the test comes, they are groggy and end up writing weird things.

Don’t write weird essays. Just go to sleep. It is one of the most important things you can do during the studying process.

One high school friend of mine drew a sailboat on an essay exam because he couldn’t gather his thoughts enough to write a great essay. In case you are curious, sailboats don’t score well on essay tests. And yes, that is a true story. You can’t make that up.

If you’ve done your work, you should be set up for a great performance on your final exams. Relax, know that you’ve done your best, and dominate the test.



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Writing Essays – The New View in Cather’s Short Story, Paul’s Case



As we analyze Willa Cather’s short story, “Paul’s Case,” we must recall that it is more than twice as long as Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” and more than three times as long as Joyce’s “Clay.” Thus, as we would expect, the length of the story provides many opportunities for richness of detail and some looseness involving the use of the strong old view value statement and the new view reversal at the end of the story. When you write your essay on the story, take that into account.

The good news — despite all that rich detail, the clarity of the core new view in Paul’s Case still finds a way to make this long, rich-in-detail story understandable.

Step #1: At the beginning of a short story, a strong value statement, an old view, is given by or about the main character.

As the story begins, Paul is in a meeting with his school principal and several of his teachers, being interviewed to see whether he should be allowed off his suspension and back into school-When questioned by the Principal as to why he was there Paul stated, politely enough, that he wanted to come back to school. This was a lie, but Paul was quite accustomed to lying; found it, indeed, indispensable for overcoming friction.

Paul didn’t really want to come back to school because he didn’t like or respect anyone there. The principal and teachers, who weren’t fond of the idea, either, formed a ring of tormentors about Paul as they interviewed him, peppering him with hostile questions.

Their negative evaluation and attitude toward Paul is expressed by the narrator in a strong value statement:

His teachers…[stated] their respective charges…with such a rancor and aggrievedness…this was not a usual case….

A strong, memorable, and vivid symbol is also mentioned-His teachers felt this afternoon that his whole attitude was symbolized by his shrug and his flippantly red carnation flower.

After Paul left the meeting, having been accepted back into school by the principal, a teacher made a second strong value statement about Paul: I don’t really believe that smile of his comes altogether from insolence; there’s something sort of haunted about it. There is something wrong about the fellow.

To this point, we have several strong value statements about Paul, as seen through the eyes of his teachers and the principal. We have been told that,

  • Paul was quite accustomed to lying & needed it to overcome friction.
  • Paul’s was not a usual case.
  • Paul has a sort of hysterically defiant, contemptuous manner.
  • Paul’s whole attitude was symbolized by his shrug and his flippant, red carnation flower.
  • There is something wrong about Paul.

And so now we have acquired two solid parts of the old view strong value statement:

…not a usual case…something wrong about the fellow.

The final part of the old view strong value statement doesn’t occur until the middle section of the story. (Talk about looseness in utilizing the old view-new view relationship!)

When Paul was kicked out of school, his father put him to work as a clerk at a company called Denny and Carson’s. His father also closed Paul’s access to Carnegie Hall and the theater troupe. The members of the theater troupe were vastly amused when they found out about Paul’s many creative stories involving them, and their evaluation fulfills the final portion of the old view strong value statement: They agreed with the faculty and with his father that Paul’s was a bad case.

We can now see all the parts of the strong value statement:

  • This was not a usual case.
  • There is something wrong about Paul.
  • Paul’s was a bad case.

And since that ties in nicely with the title of the story, on the matter of the old view I rest my — errr, Paul’s — case.

Step #2: In the middle of a short story, the old view is supported or undercut with descriptions, conflicts, and resolutions that set up the new view at the end.

DESCRIPTION: One description plays a major role in supporting the old view. Paul lived on Cordelia street, and, after late-night concerts, Paul never went up Cordelia Street without a shudder of loathing. He approached it with the nerveless sense of defeat, the hopeless feeling of sinking back forever into ugliness and commonness that he had always had when he came home. He experienced all the physical depression which follows a debauch; the loathing of respectable beds, of common food, of a house penetrated by kitchen odors.

The description and the name of the street are not coincidental. Cordelia is the name of the rejected daughter in Shakespeare’s play, “King Lear.” It is plain that Paul feels rejected by his father, as Cordelia was by hers. And Paul, in turn, rejects the poverty of his home, the plainness of his life, and the dullness of his life at school, preferring the exotic, unreal life of art, music, and theater to the harsh realities of his real life.

CONFLICT: From various incidents, we find conflict supporting the old view as Paul grapples with his father’s wrath and rejection by constantly lying to him about why he is late coming home, where he has been, or where he is going. For instance, one Sunday he can’t stand his ugly home, so he tells his father he’s going to a friend’s house to study.

RESOLUTION: But he goes instead to hang out with his friend, Charley Edwards, the leading juvenile of the permanent stock company which played at one of the downtown theaters. So Paul resolved his conflicts by lying, going outside reality and associating with people who live the unreal, exotic life of art, music, and theater: Matters went steadily worse with Paul at school. In the itch to let his instructors know how heartily he despised them and their homilies, and how thoroughly he was appreciated elsewhere, he mentioned once or twice that he had no time to fool with theorems; adding-with a twitch of the eyebrows and a touch of that nervous bravado which so perplexed them-that he was helping the people down at the stock company; they were old friends of his.

CONFLICT: Paul was kicked out of school, and his father put him to work as a clerk at a company called Denny and Carson’s. His father also closed Paul’s access to Carnegie Hall and the theater troupe. Paul hated and internally resisted the situation.

RESOLUTION: With his real life of fantasy closed to him, Paul resolves his conflict by lying (as usual, outside of reality) about a deposit he was supposed to make for his employer, stealing about three thousand dollars. And he went to New York to live the life of the gloriously rich. In those days, three thousand dollars went a long ways.

Step #3. At the end of a short story, a new view reversal of the old view is usually revealed.

At the end of the story, Paul has gone to New York where he is surrounded by many people, sort of a ring of admirers who give him respect, the reverse of the ring of tormentors at the story’s beginning, even though the respect at the end is based on his false, stolen wealth. And Paul plays his new role by showing his own respect toward everyone in New York at the end, quite the reverse from how he had been flippantly treating others at the beginning of the story.

The title, “Paul’s Case,” and the use of not a usual case and a bad case in the beginning and the middle all refer to something never specifically verbalized within the story. But the meaning is shown very clearly — Paul has problems with growing up, with school, with home, with identity, with finding himself, and with belonging.

Actually, it is not unusual for a young man to have such problems growing up. In Paul’s case, however, it was not a usual case — it was more than that, it was a bad case. But the ending reveals that Paul’s case was a lot worse than merely bad — it was deadly, it was fatal, since it ended with Paul’s suicide. So we see that the ending of the story emphasizes a drastic expansion of the old view to a new view that is adding, not only reversing, showing that Paul’s case was far more serious and far more dangerous or bad than anyone had realized or imagined.

On the other hand, at the beginning of the story Paul was daydreaming his fantasies about the theater, whereas at the end of the story he was actually living the privileged life of the respected wealthy — even if only for a short time — not merely fantasizing it. That reversal is what counted most — at least, from Paul’s point of view.

Whether you choose in your essay to emphasize the new view reversal of Paul’s situation or the reversal for his teachers, his father, and others at the very end, our analysis of the new view core does provide the lens through which we can clearly see through all the details to the new view reversal and expansion at the end.



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Research Paper Ideas – Where Can You Get Them?



If they assign topics then half the problem is done but if they do not assign topics then you should be well prepared to find a suitable topic to write on! Well here are a few ways to get the best term paper ideas you could ever wish for.

  1. Archived papers- take a look at the papers which have been archived in the libraries of your school or college. You can get an idea of the writing style your professors want and what topics have already been covered. If you do like the writing style and topic then do take a look at the index and bibliography of the written paper. You will get a list of related topics which you can use for inspiration and to search out for a topic of your own.
  2. Always ask your teacher to give you a list of the topics which have already been covered to prevent repeating yourself endlessly. Reading the same thing again and again is not interesting to professors and you could lose out on grades due to this.
  3. Once you’ve got a tentative list of short listed topics, please do show that to your professor to allow his to sift out those which are already covered or too broad and too narrow.
  4. Writing on controversial topics is really great for a beginner but unless your professor expressly asks for a controversial topic don’t attempt it. Brainstorm on several topics to find one which is the best for your needs. Then do show these topics to a few of your friends as they can tell you a few more interesting options which you can use to brainstorm even more.
  5. Stick to the instruction sheet that your professor gives you. Remain inside the criteria that your professor has assigned to you or he is more than likely to reject any topics you shortlist and you will lose almost all of your hard work.
  6. When you do select a topic make sure that you have sufficient research to back up your theory and thesis. Sometimes the newer ideas are very, very, secret and you might not get enough to back it up! As a result you might not be able to reach the word limit of the essay you have been requested for your paper. Don’t mess around with your word limits and your font size irrespective if you are feeling lazy as this can get you in trouble.
  7. Do your research for your term paper well. You should be able to defend you paper well. Be well versed in almost all the pros and cons of your topic as this is the only way you can defend your topic well.

Make a list of all your research paper ideas as you should be able to keep them together and then keep them ready for your professor to sort through.



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Persuasive Essay Topics – How to Come Up With Persuasive Topics For Your Readers



You need to come up with persuasive essay topics to effectively drive your point home. In fact, these literary texts, as the name implies, are created to persuade readers to your way of thinking.

In more ways than none, persuasive essay topics should convey the meaning of your reasoning. In fact, the topic should be constructed in a direct and concise manner, leaving no room for error and purely debatable.

You might say that the context of a persuasive essay should be open for more reasoning from other people.

What To Write About

When picking out persuasive essay topics to write about, it would be best to stick with your own personal opinions so that you will have a definite idea on what to put in it.

In most cases, you need to come up with a topic that will allow others to see your point of view, and telling them to believe that what you write is true.

Common topics for persuasive writing today include those of moral issues, like abortion, premarital sex, physical abuse on women, and so on. These general topics are purely debatable, and will be a perfect topic for your opinionated work.

Also, it would also be best to pick one where you have some experience in. You need to provide sample scenarios, as well as other details to drive your point home.

How To Pick Out A Topic

For starters, you need to come up with persuasive essay topics that are interesting to your readers. Your literary work will count as nothing if there are no one to share with your thoughts and opinions.

First off, choose a topic that is interesting for you before you consider how others will react to it. You need to make sure that you are very interested in the topic before you can persuade others about it.

Next, you need to think of the method on how you want to relay it to your readers. You first need to determine the reason for your essay, before you can write persuasive content about it. Set your objective first, and then come up with a way to write it in an interesting manner for your readers to enjoy.

In a matter of speaking, picking out persuasive essay topics is like telling yourself what you want to convey to the rest of the world. Besides, you need to be knowledgeable enough about it to persuade yourself before you can actually persuade others with it.



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Bis 303 (managing info. in hospitality industry) week 5 complete a+


BIS 303 (Managing Information in Hospitality Industry)

 

Week 5

 

BIS 303 Week 5 DQ 1

 

How could a point-of-sale system be used to simplify employee training of kitchen staff? What about the accounting staff?

BIS 303 Week 5 DQ 2

 

Explain standard hospitality privacy issues for the hospitality industry.

BIS 303 Week 5 DQ 3

 

Distinguish between internal and external threats to IT databases.

 

Week 5 Assignments:

 

Hospitality Information Systems: How Marketing at Baderman Island Uses Information Technology (1450+)

 

Internal and External Security (1000+) Words



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Bis 320 (business information systems) complete course week 1-5 dq’s


BIS 320 (Business Information Systems)

 

Week 1

 

BIS 320 Week 1 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Think about functional areas within an organization, such as payroll, human resources, and sales. How are software and hardware used in these departments to meet their informational objectives?

BIS 320 Week 1 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Is open-source software a viable solution? Why or why not? Use the terminology of closed source, source code, and machine code. Explain why open source could be a legitimate alternative but may not be appropriate for a specific application, such as a payroll application

 

 

Week 2

BIS 320 Week 2 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What is the value of information? Is it an asset? Why or why not? Can you use information for decision making? How could databases or a Microsoft® Excel® spread sheet help with this? Explain. Consider how information gives you knowledge and power. How can a business use this knowledge and power? Explain.

 

BIS 320 Week 2 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

When preparing end of the year information for stockholders, how can charts help illustrate the information that stockholders are interested in? Provide specific examples. Is it possible to skew the charts to make the data appear better than it really is? If so, what are some examples of how this might happen? 

 

Week 2 Assignments:

 

Determining Operating Systems and Software Applications (1150+ Words)

Week 2 Reflection – Outline

 

 

Week 3

 

BIS 320 Week 3 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What new Internet technologies and collaboration tools are available today? Which of these resources are essentially free? Describe two opportunities for taking advantage of those free resources. 

 

BIS 320 Week 3 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What are the pros and cons of social networks in business? How can companies use social networks to improve business? 

 

Week 3 Assignments:

 

 Determining Databases and Data Communications 1050+ Words

Week 3 Reflection – Outline (850+ Words)

 

 

Week 4

 

BIS 320 Week 4 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Read Case Study 12 in Ch. 12 of MIS Essentials. Considering the viewpoints of customers, law enforcement, personnel, investors, and management, did ChoicePoint make the best decision? Discuss your rationale for each viewpoint. Given ChoicePoint’s experience, what is the likely action of similar companies whose records are compromised in this way? 

 

BIS 320 Week 4 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

How might you explain to a friend who is not technically savvy what phishing is and how it can be avoided?  What are five tips you would provide to help your friend avoid phishing?

 

Week 4 Assignments:

 

BIS 320 Week 4 Using Collaboration Tools to Market Products (7 Slides)

 

Week 4 Reflection – Outline (1150+ Words)

 

 

Week 5

 

BIS 320 Week 5 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What are some of the problems that you see with SDLC? Why is SDLC considered a waterfall process, and why can this be a problem?

 

BIS 320 Week 5 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Can systems development ever be considered risky? Why? 

 

Week 5 Assignments:      

                                                           

Applying Information Security and SDLC to Business   (1150+ Words)

 

Week 5 Team Reflection (600+ Words)

 

 



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Bis 320 (business information systems) complete course week 1-5 dq’s


BIS 320 (Business Information Systems)
 

Week 1

 

BIS 320 Week 1 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Think about functional areas within an organization, such as payroll, human resources, and sales. How are software and hardware used in these departments to meet their informational objectives?

BIS 320 Week 1 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Is open-source software a viable solution? Why or why not? Use the terminology of closed source, source code, and machine code. Explain why open source could be a legitimate alternative but may not be appropriate for a specific application, such as a payroll application

 

 

Week 2

BIS 320 Week 2 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What is the value of information? Is it an asset? Why or why not? Can you use information for decision making? How could databases or a Microsoft® Excel® spread sheet help with this? Explain. Consider how information gives you knowledge and power. How can a business use this knowledge and power? Explain.

 

BIS 320 Week 2 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

When preparing end of the year information for stockholders, how can charts help illustrate the information that stockholders are interested in? Provide specific examples. Is it possible to skew the charts to make the data appear better than it really is? If so, what are some examples of how this might happen? 

 

Week 2 Assignments:

 

Determining Operating Systems and Software Applications (1150+ Words)

Week 2 Reflection – Outline

 

 

Week 3

 

BIS 320 Week 3 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What new Internet technologies and collaboration tools are available today? Which of these resources are essentially free? Describe two opportunities for taking advantage of those free resources. 

 

BIS 320 Week 3 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What are the pros and cons of social networks in business? How can companies use social networks to improve business? 

 

Week 3 Assignments:

 

 Determining Databases and Data Communications 1050+ Words

Week 3 Reflection – Outline (850+ Words)

 

 

Week 4

 

BIS 320 Week 4 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Read Case Study 12 in Ch. 12 of MIS Essentials. Considering the viewpoints of customers, law enforcement, personnel, investors, and management, did ChoicePoint make the best decision? Discuss your rationale for each viewpoint. Given ChoicePoint’s experience, what is the likely action of similar companies whose records are compromised in this way? 

 

BIS 320 Week 4 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

How might you explain to a friend who is not technically savvy what phishing is and how it can be avoided?  What are five tips you would provide to help your friend avoid phishing?

 

Week 4 Assignments:

 

BIS 320 Week 4 Using Collaboration Tools to Market Products (7 Slides)

 

Week 4 Reflection – Outline (1150+ Words)

 

 

Week 5

 

BIS 320 Week 5 DQ 1

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

What are some of the problems that you see with SDLC? Why is SDLC considered a waterfall process, and why can this be a problem?

 

BIS 320 Week 5 DQ 2

Post a 200-300-word response to the following discussion question by clicking on Reply.

Can systems development ever be considered risky? Why? 

 

Week 5 Assignments:      

                                                           

Applying Information Security and SDLC to Business   (1150+ Words)

 

Week 5 Team Reflection (600+ Words)

 

 



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